Scenariile privind viitorul Uniunii Europene

După ce am analizat şi răsanalizat, am măsurat, am cântărit şi testat fizico-chimic şi termodinamic mie mi se pare că scenariile 1, 3 şi 5  propuse de Comisia Europeană ar fi ce ne trebuie, viabil ar fi scenariul 3, care ar rupe gura târgului iar dezirabil ar fi o combinație între scenariile 1,3 şi 5 care ne-ar coafa corespunzător.

La voi ce scenariu iese ?

Anunțuri

Medieval

Kalamazoo by  Josephine Livingstone

Every year, three thousand people gather in Kalamazoo for the sake of the years 400 to 1400 (approximately) of the Common Era. The International Congress on Medieval Studies, held annually at Western Michigan University, is the largest gathering of medievalists on earth. They come from all over the world to participate in panels like “Attack and Counterattack: The Embattled Frontiers of Medieval Iberia,” “Waste Studies: Excrement in the Middle Ages,” “Historical, Ethnical and Religious Roots of the Thraco-Geto-Dacians and Their Successors: Romanians and Vlaho-Romanians” and “J. K. Rowling’s Medievalism (I & II).” They are literary critics, historians, experts in numismatics and linguistic datasets, and nuns. There are over five hundred sessions: meetings and drinks parties and bookstalls; groups of monks dressed in black; bespectacled, serious, young men; elderly ladies in capped sleeves. Here is a ragtag bunch of human beings all on the same pilgrimage, playing a part in a story that they can’t read, because they’re in it.

Julia Kristeva

Bulgaria Says French Thinker Was a Secret Agent. She Calls It a ‘Barefaced Lie.’ By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER and BORYANA DZHAMBAZOVA

Julia Kristeva, at 76, is one of Europe’s most decorated public intellectuals. Her more than 30 books have covered topics including linguistics, psychoanalysis, literary theory and feminism. Her many prestigious honors include the Vaclav Havel Prize, the Hannah Arendt Prize and France’s Commander of the Legion of Honor.
But now, a furor has arisen over whether it is time to add a more surprising line to her résumé: Bulgarian secret agent.
The notion surfaced on Tuesday, when the Bulgarian government commission charged with reviewing the files of the country’s notorious Communist-era secret service released a terse document alleging that the Bulgarian-born Ms. Kristeva, who has lived in France since 1966, had served in the early 1970s as an agent known by the code name “Sabina.”
The allegation was greeted with shocked disbelief by those immersed in the work of Ms. Kristeva, who is known for her staunch defense of European democratic ideals and opposition to all “totalitarianisms,” as she puts it, whether state Communism, American-style identity politics or religious fundamentalism.
The mystery only deepened on Friday, when the commission, in response to intense international interest, took the unusual step of posting online the entire dossier on Ms. Kristeva.

The hundreds of pages of documents include Ms. Kristeva’s supposed registration card as an agent of Bulgaria’s former Committee for State Security and extensive reports of alleged conversations with her handlers in Parisian cafes and restaurants between 1971 and 1973. But there is not a single intelligence-related document written or signed by her.

 

Sean Penn scriitor

Sean Penn’s debut novel – repellent and stupid

Back in the heady days of 2015, it was thought that singer and eternal tester of patience Morrissey had taken the bad celebrity novel to the limit in List of the Lost, when his “bulbous salutation” simultaneously put everyone off both books and sex. But now Morrissey’s debut – a novel in which people didn’t just say things, they “topspin” them (“‘I have erotic curiosities,’ topspins Ezra”) – has a healthy challenger for the most mocked novel by a sleb. Sean Penn’s Bob Honey Who Just Do Stuff is a book in which people don’t just have vim or vigour, they have “spizzerinctum to spare”.
Early and bad reviews of Penn’s debut novel ahead of its April release have prompted a lot of joy online. “Bob Honey is an exercise in ass-showing, a 160-page self-own,” was the Huffington Post’s verdict, while a new game, “Vagina bingo” was coined by one Twitter user to mark Penn’s multitudinous references to vulvas (always “magical” and “glistening”, on often “nymphomaniac” and “whoreish” women).
So Penn’s novel is repellent on one level, but stupid on so many others. It follows Bob as he Just Do Stuff, often without much reason: he variously sells septic tanks, rigs explosives and kills American pensioners with a mallet, purportedly to offset their large carbon footprint. He daydreams about a hairless woman called Annie, whose alopecia is no barrier to their sexual escapades. (“Never one for psychosexual infantilism or paedophilic fantasy, after their sex he said, ‘Good vagina. Maybe more Vietnam.’”) At one point he sets fire to a dildo in the desert, due to “an assault of animism”, which makes just as much sense as anything else in the book.

Cum merge guvernarea ?

Daca luam in calcul ultima sceneta, cea cu descentralizarea, guvernarea merge prost.

Dragnea: Aproape toți miniștrii se opun descentralizării. Am rugat premierul să convoace o întâlnire pentru a lămuri atitudinea lor. via hotnews Vezi stirea aici.

Este greu de stabilit ce e mai periculos in aceasta situatie ? Faptul ca proaspetii ministrii deja au o problema de autoritate in ministere ? Ca PSD, atunci când a adoptat capitolul de descentralizare din programul de guvernare, nu stia ce si cum sa gestioneze in procesul de descentralizare ? Poate este ingrijorator ca Premierul Dancila nu este in stare, nu are autoritatea de a lua decizii si de a tine piept unor argumente prezentate de ministrii refractari ?

Eu cred ca PSD are un program de descentralizare care a fost intocmit neprofesionist, in care Liviu Dragnea si-a varsat toate frustrarile ca fost ministru al dezvoltarii regionale care a esuat in a lansa descentralizarea.

 

Piata universitara

When “Free Speech” Is a Marketing Ploy by Osita Nwanevu 

On Jan. 24, it was announced that former White House adviser and Breitbart chairman Steve Bannon had accepted an invitation from University of Chicago business school professor Luigi Zingales to participate in a debate on campus. “I can hardly think of a more important issue for new citizens and business leaders of the world than the backlash against globalization and immigration that is taking place not just in America, but in all the Western World,” Zingales wrote in a statement. “Whether you agree with him or not (and I personally do not), Mr. Bannon has come to interpret and represent this backlash in America.”
Zingales and university administrators have, predictably, spent the past several weeks dealing with a backlash of their own. Over 1,000 alumni, more than 100 faculty members, the executives of student government and nearly a dozen student groups have voiced their opposition to the event in various mediums. “[W]hen speakers who question the intellect and full humanity of people of color are invited to campus to ‘debate’ their worthiness as citizens and people, ” a faculty open letter read, “the message is clear that the University’s commitment to freedom of expression will come at the expense of those most vulnerable in our community.” Off-campus, many have scorned those protesting the invitation. “The school has a long tradition of valuing free speech and thought, recognizing that a university is — wait for it — a place of ideas and learning,” the Chicago Tribune’s editorial board wrote after the announcement. “The ‘cure’ for repellent ideas, school President Robert Maynard Hutchins said generations ago, ‘lies through open discussion rather than through inhibition.’ ”